Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Winter Blues



Now it's getting to be the time of year where the sun sets in the afternoon and it's not uncommon for people to get a little wilty, some to the degree that it's Seasonal Affective Disorder. As the weather gets colder there are fewer opportunities to comfortably be outside, and snow adds an extra element of danger while traveling for those of us with mobility issues. However cold weather brings a break from some potentially stressful situations: There are very few pool parties and beach days during Chicago winter, and when we're all bundled up under 17 layers, everyone's gender presentation is "warm". Tonight we'll chatting about how we can avoid unwanted isolation, check in with ourselves about depression, and what else we need to thrive during the upcoming season.

The silly question is: "What would be in your ideal blanket fort?"
Wednesday, December 30th, 7:00pm to 8:15pm
Center on Halsted, 2nd Floor (Room 202)
3656 N. Halsted St. 

Genderqueer Chicago is as safe a space as we can make it. To help with this, we have some working agreements that we would like all who come to meetings to keep in mind while within our safe space meetings. Please check out our working agreements here.
Safe space meetings are strictly closed to researchers and reporters in their professional capacities. Meetings are open to anyone else wanting to talk and think about gender! For more info, give us a shout at genderqueerchicago@gmail.com!

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Thanksgiving Tactics

Edited to add a notice!: Helpful tips from today's discussion will be collected, de-identified, and posted on the blog and the Facebook group. Anyone has the option for their personal contribution to not be posted, at their discretion. 

Holidays are times when some of us have to interact with blood relatives who are less than supportive and sometimes flat out hostile. It's often a mix between affirming some parts of your identity while denying others, and the nuances make things complicated. Some of us live with or near them and have to navigate those relationships all year long, and some of us do not have relationships with them at all. Some questions to consider answers to for tonight's topic:


  • How and when, if at all, do you talk to someone you love if they say something that hurts you? 
  • How and when, if at all, do you talk to someone you depend on emotionally, logistically, or financially if they say something that hurts you? 
  • What does confrontation look like for you? 
  • What are some of the things that help you feel grounded during the holidays? 
  • What alternatives have you found for when being around blood relatives isn't a financial or emotional option? 
  • How do you take care of yourself after being in an emotionally escalated situation?
The Southern Poverty Law Center posted a guide to addressing possible scenarios called Speak Up: Responding to Everyday Bigotry that I feel has some good scripts to start from. There are also more specific resources and events in Chicago for talking to families with specific religious and/or cultural backgrounds.

The silly question is: What's the last thing you really looked forward to?

Next week's topic will be an open topic. In addition, there will be a small gathering at a private residence on the 24th for those of us who have been to a GQC meeting before and want somewhere to be on that day. Location is to be announced, we're still working out the accessibility of different options. For details, accessibility needs, dietary restrictions, and other questions, feel free to email us at genderqueerchicago@gmail.com or talk to a moderator at a meeting.




Wednesday, November 16th, 7:00pm to 8:15pm
Center on Halsted, 2nd Floor (Room 202)
3656 N. Halsted St. 

Genderqueer Chicago is as safe a space as we can make it. To help with this, we have some working agreements that we would like all who come to meetings to keep in mind while within our safe space meetings. Please check out our working agreements here.
Safe space meetings are strictly closed to researchers and reporters in their professional capacities. Meetings are open to anyone else wanting to talk and think about gender! For more info, give us a shout at genderqueerchicago@gmail.com!

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

TDOR and You



     First, an apology for the last two meetings not having a blog post. They were announced on the Facebook page as cancelled due to Cubs games over safety concerns, but unfortunately that was not posted here for those who don't follow the group there. Changes have been made so that topics can be announced much earlier to allow members more time to plan accordingly, and will go into effect within the week, and they will be cross-posted on both platforms

     The topic for the upcoming meeting will be focused on Transgender Day of Remembrance. Because of the emotionally charged nature of the day, the discussion will have content warnings for transphobia, transmisogyny, assault, death, murder, and suicide, as these are likely to come up in the conversation. As a reminder, one of our working agreements is "Escape Route", which allows for any member to leave the room at any point and return at any point, no questions asked, and could come especially handy should the conversation become overwhelming at any point. The actual day of TDOR is November 20th, and Center on Halsted will have an event that evening in observance.

The silly question will be "What's the oddest thing you've overheard?"


Wednesday, November 9th, 7:00pm to 8:15pm
Center on Halsted, 2nd Floor (Room 202)
3656 N. Halsted St. 

Genderqueer Chicago is as safe a space as we can make it. To help with this, we have some working agreements that we would like all who come to meetings to keep in mind while within our safe space meetings. Please check out our working agreements here.
Safe space meetings are strictly closed to researchers and reporters in their professional capacities. Meetings are open to anyone else wanting to talk and think about gender! For more info, give us a shout at genderqueerchicago@gmail.com!

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